Publication by Carolyn Fischer in Nature

Environmental economist Carolyn Fischer et al. had their article on Policy design for the Anthropocene published in Nature Sustainability, a special edition of Nature. Nature is one of the most recognizable scientific journals in the world, and is ascribed an impact factor of around 40, making it one of the world's top academic journals. The authors investigate the complexities of the complexities of designing policies that can keep Earth within the biophysical limits favourable to human life.

16-01-2019 | 15:09

Today, more than ever, ‘Spaceship Earth’ is an apt metaphor as we chart the boundaries for a safe planet1. Social scientists both analyse why society courts disaster by approaching or even overstepping these boundaries and try to design suitable policies to avoid these perils. Because the threats of transgressing planetary boundaries are global, long-run, uncertain and interconnected, they must be analysed together to avoid conflicts and take advantage of synergies. To obtain policies that are effective at both international and local levels requires careful analysis of the underlying mechanisms across scientific disciplines and approaches, and must take politics into account. In this perspective, we examine the complexities of designing policies that can keep Earth within the biophysical limits favourable to human life.

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About Carolyn Fischer
Carolyn Fischer is professor of environmental economics at VU-Amsterdam, a senior fellow with Resources for the Future, a Tinbergen Institute affiliate, and a fellow of the CESifo Research Network. She was the Marks Visiting Professor at Gothenburg University 2017-2018 and an EU Marie Skłodowska–Curie Fellow 2014-2016. She currently serves as Vice President and Council Member for the European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. She is co-editor of Environmental and Resource Economics and serves on the editorial board of the Review of Environmental Economics and Policy and the International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics. She earned her Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Michigan—Ann Arbor in 1997.